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Date:
03 December 2012
Summary:
NHS Health Scotland has been tasked by the Scottish Government to lead the evaluation of Scotland's alcohol strategy through the Monitoring and Evaluating Scotland’s Alcohol Strategy (MESAS) work programme. There is a commitment to providing annual reports from MESAS and in March 2011 the first annual report (the baseline report) was published.

The current report is the second annual report and provides an update of Scotland’s alcohol strategy, the evaluation plan and the analyses of price, consumption, affordability and alcohol-related harms detailed in the baseline report. Additionally, this report presents findings from the evaluation of the implementation of Alcohol Brief Interventions (ABIs) in selected settings.
Languages:
English

Date:
03 October 2012
Summary:
This review focuses on the effectiveness of interventions to support parents, their infants and children in the early years (pregnancy to 5 years). The evidence overview was produced in conjunction with the development of the outcomes framework to inform the activities of the National Parenting Strategy (NPS).

The outcomes framework is being developed to support the NPS to focus on the key results we want to achieve in Scotland. Work so far has identified the national, long-term and medium-term outcomes for the NPS and these are illustrated in the ‘strategic logic model’. It is important to note that this framework is a working draft and will be further developed and refined as part of this ongoing piece of work.

This process is being supported by the Evaluation Team and Evidence for Action Team at NHS Health Scotland.
Languages:
English

Date:
28 September 2012
Summary:
The Review of equality health data needs in Scotland (2012) was commissioned to meet recommendation 74 of the ‘Equally Well’ implementation plan (external website).

Health data needs were reviewed for gender, ethnicity, age, disability, religion and belief, sexual orientation and transgender identity. A comprehensive audit of routinely available Scottish data sources was undertaken.

The review makes recommendations for data development for improving individual care at the point of delivery, and for providing aggregate analyses of prevalence, access, experience and outcomes, in order to reduce health inequalities.
Languages:
English

Date:
16 August 2012
Summary:
An evaluation of the implementation of, and compliance with, the objectives of the Licensing (Scotland) Act 2005: Sub-study of Test Purchasing and other measures to enforce underage alcohol sales regulations.

In Scotland it is an offence for a person to sell alcohol to, or to obtain alcohol on behalf of a child or young person aged under 18 years. A number of measures are in place to help prevent illegal underage sales of alcohol, including test purchasing, Challenge 25, proof of age schemes and bottle marking schemes. To explore the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of these measures and to identify lessons for improvement, an eight-month sub-study was undertaken as part of the evaluation of the implementation of, and compliance with, the objectives of the Licensing (Scotland) Act 2005.

Based on interviews with representatives from the police, prosecution service and licensing boards in three case study police force areas, together with structured interviews with a sample of licence holders, the study found that although there were perceived barriers to all of the approaches aimed at enforcing underage alcohol sales regulations, test purchasing was seen as a very useful way to gauge and potentially improve licensed trade staff practice. A majority of licence holders also reported that test purchasing was their preferred enforcement tool, as long as it was used in tandem with a robust proof of age documentation scheme. Although all of the mechanisms were perceived to have resulted in a reduction in direct sales of alcohol to underage young people, the consensus was that these measures used in isolation were not sufficient to reduce alcohol consumption in this age group.
Languages:
English

Date:
15 June 2012
Summary:
This report provides a preliminary descriptive assessment of the impact of the quantity discount ban on off-trade alcohol sales in Scotland. It is based on analyses of weekly sales data for the 33-week period post-implementation of the ban compared with the corresponding 33-week period 12 months previously. Comparisons with England & Wales, and trends in off-trade sales before the ban was introduced, are also considered
Languages:
English

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